Start Bottle dating page

Bottle dating page

Typically embossed on the bottle itself, though sometimes printed on the label, these words will date your whiskey to sometime between 1932 – 1964.

Bottle label designs can change over the years and advertising will always depict what the label looked like at that time so consumers could go out and get that exact bottle. if you’re looking for some other great whiskey bottle dating resources give these a peek.

You can basically use advertising as a visual history of label changes.

Perhaps manufacturers believed that consumers still shared this view and lead them to include their own strip once tax strips were no longer required.

(via Walter Hurst) If you’re lucky enough to score a dusty bonded whiskey your job is even easier because the green tax strip will state both the made (distilled) and bottled date.

Look for any clues on the bottle itself that’ll pin point it. Some bottle codes are easy to decipher while others are not, but if they exist they’re a great place to start.

In the image above we see that it’s commemorating the 200th anniversary of Evan Williams and on the bottle they say the distillery was founded in 1783. If you can’t decipher them, and can’t find anyone else online who has a clue, reach out to the maker (if possible) and see if they can steer you in the right direction.

Some states also used their own tax stamps (top left of the bottle above) which can give clues like the State Treasurer’s name, tax rate, State Secretary’s signature, etc. It’s a Manufacturer’s strip designed to reproduce the general look of a tax strip.

Most of that info can be looked up online so you can narrow your date range by looking up who was in charge when the tax stamp was used. Strips like this were added by many manufacturers in the mid 80’s after the tax strip requirement was lifted.

Most strips of this type were only produced for a few years at best, as manufacturers soon realized that most of their consumers had never dealt with any “refilled” bottles, as was so common to find prior to the 1940’s.

For nearly 100 Years the use of a Federal tax strip over the cap/cork of a bottle ensured that the bottle’s contents were genuine.

Bottles, jars, jugs and containers of all types, antique fruit jars, glass insulators, fishing net floats, EAPG (Early American Pattern Glass), Depression Glass, antique children’s mugs, and other items are some of the forms of glass I enjoy learning more about.