Start A researcher who uses carbon dating on ancient times

A researcher who uses carbon dating on ancient times

On the other hand, according to Fomenko the word "Rome" is a placeholder and can signify any one of several different cities and kingdoms.

AD 1100, more than a full millennium after the events they describe, and they did not come to scholars' attention until the 15th century.

According to Fomenko, the 15th century is probably when these documents were first written.

The historical Jesus is a composite figure and reflection of the Old-Testament prophet Elisha (850–800 BC? –1085), Saint Basil of Caesarea (330–379), and even Li Yuanhao (also known as Emperor Jingzong or "Son of Heaven" - emperor of Western Xia, who reigned in 1032–48), Euclides, Bacchus and Dionysius.

Fomenko explains the seemingly vast differences in the biographies of these figures as resulting from difference in languages, points of view and time-frame of the authors of said accounts and biographies.

By the early 1990s, Fomenko shifted his focus from trying to convince the scientific community via peer-reviewed publications to publishing books.

Beam writes that Fomenko and his colleagues were discovered by the Soviet scientific press in the early 1980s, leading to "a brief period of renown"; a contemporary review from the Soviet journal Questions of History complained, "Their constructions have nothing in common with Marxist historical science." According to New Chronology, the traditional chronology consists of four overlapping copies of the "true" chronology shifted back in time by significant intervals with some further revisions.

The idea of chronologies that differ from the conventional chronology can be traced back to at least the early 17th century.

Jean Hardouin then suggested that many ancient historical documents were much younger than commonly believed to be.

Central to Fomenko's New Chronology is his claim of the existence of a vast Slav-Turk empire, which he called the "Russian Horde", which he says played the dominant role in Eurasian history before the 17th century.

The various peoples identified in ancient and medieval history, from the Scythians, Huns, Goths and Bulgars, through the Polyane, Duleby, Drevliane, Pechenegs, to in more recent times, the Cossacks, Ukrainians, and Belarusians, are nothing but elements of the single Russian Horde.

In 1980, together with a few colleagues from the mathematics department of Moscow State University, he published several articles on "new mathematical methods in history" in peer-reviewed journals.